Rogue Valley Hang Gliding & Paragliding Association http://rvhpa.org RVHPA is the local Hang Gliding & Paragliding Club in SW Oregon and far Northern California. Our main flying sites are Woodrat Mountain, The Whaleback, Herd Peak, and others in the Rogue, Applegate, and Shasta Valleys. Sat, 19 Aug 2017 17:45:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Temporary closure at Woodrat http://rvhpa.org/news/temporary-closure-at-woodrat/ Fri, 18 Aug 2017 20:53:13 +0000 http://rvhpa.org/?p=3927 Due reduced visibility from smoke along with fire fighting activities and increased air traffic in the valley the Hunter and LongSword LZs are closed until further notice. RVHPA member Pilots are asked not to launch from mid or upper launches at Woodrat mountain until further notice.  

There is a staging base with helicopters taking off and landing in the field west of the LongSword LZ along with air tanker traffic flying over the valley.

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Member phone numbers http://rvhpa.org/uncategorized/member-phone-numbers/ Sun, 11 Jun 2017 17:43:02 +0000 http://rvhpa.org/?p=3909 Note some members are not shown by their preference:
Name
cell
Membership type
USHPA #
pg-rating
hg-rating
jared anderson
541-301-8861
Visiting Pilot
86642
P5
Ron Andresen
530-598-1215
Local Pilot
90013
P4
Julian Ansell
5034966943
Local Pilot
98623
P2
Krista Auchenbach
4122873495
Visiting Pilot
91012
P4
David Bacon
2504882067
Visiting Pilot
50363
H4
Eric Bader
303-704-1164
Visiting Pilot
93444
P4
Michael Beck
831 235-2050
Visiting pilot
68831
P4
H4
Robert Beighley
303 817-3181
Visiting pilot
91811
P3
Briana Bergman
(541) 690-7494
Local Pilot
98520
P1
Jeremy Bishop
619 618-6173
Visiting Pilot
83741
P4
Dave Blizzard
(503)828-6689
Visiting Pilot
88527
P3
karl blust
5419449415
Local Pilot
71190
P4
Evan Bouchier
9709460561
Visiting Pilot
88047
P4
caleb bourg
5186510310
7 Day Pilot
98390
P2
Scott Braddock
9282745446
Visiting Pilot
94354
P2
Scott Braddock
19282745446
Visiting Pilot
94354
P3
Soren Braddock
(678)709-3720
Visiting Pilot
89641
P4
H2
Tyler Bradford
8054030478
Visiting Pilot
86254
P4
Tyler Bradford
8054030478
Visiting Pilot
86254
P4
Forrest Brault
(541) 951-6606
Local Pilot
87734
P4
Kirk Bridgers
5419449679
Local Pilot
88370
P4
H3
Jim Bronson
650-815-5885
Local Pilot
73938
P3
William Brown
9078304378
Visiting Pilot
77028
P4
Lynn Bryson
7208396690
Local Pilot
98519
P0
Stephen Buckingham
310-633-0059
Visiting Pilot
96473
P2
Jphn (Jay) Cady III
406 457-6895
Visiting pilot
96332
P3
Robert Campbell
5416214377
Local Pilot
90776
P2
Chris Carolin
(510) 378-4836
Visiting Pilot
96366
P2
Steve Carpentier
503-333-8050
Visiting Pilot
93320
P3
Steven Carter
218-248-0118
Local Pilot
95409
* P0 * P1 * P2 * P3
Jason Chang
925-699-8564
Visiting Pilot
93817
P3
Tom Cesnut
541 915-0187
Visiting pilot
69760
P4
Jerry Christopher
919 344-9764
visiting Pilot
98245
P3
Jerry Christopher
919 344-9764
Visiting pilot
98245
P3
Benny Cochran
541 488-5177
local pilot
88513
Josh Cohn
5102993701
Visiting pilot
53890
P4
Michael Coppock
360-624-1856
Visiting Pilot
93913
P3
Ryan Corey
408-891-4948
Local Pilot
96347
P2
David Cox
303-868-9277
Visiting Pilot
93925
P3
Nick Crane
541-840-8587
Local Commercial Pilot
81458
P4
Sam Crocker
5037811795
Local Commercial Pilot
76946
P4
Jay Cromer
5419413801
Local Pilot
84500
P4
Aaron Cromer
5204407644
Local Pilot
89899
P4
Gene Davies
5416212859
Local Pilot
59703
P3
Mike Deacon
15304121509
Visiting Pilot
80845
P3
H2
Lori Dirks
2064274234
Visiting Pilot
88686
P4
David Elliott
8015578574
Visiting Pilot
59354
P4
H3
TERRI EUBANKS
5417782937
Local Pilot
96491
P2
Tony Evans
17802012056
Visiting Pilot
91980
P3
Scott Farnsworth
541 890 1087
Local Pilot
88766
P4
H3
Peter Fay
18082833072
Visiting Pilot
93202
P4
Theresa Fielding
206-940-8413
visiting pilot
96829
P3
Don Fitch
541-821-4269
Local Pilot
71618
P3
David Fitzwater`
5033516852
Local Pilot
90576
P2
H3
Alan Flemming
843-513-2533
Visiting Pilot
71672
P3
H2
Ean Flockoi
5412926616
Local Pilot
97257
P2
Mark Forbes
541-760-3231
Visiting Pilot
63020
P2
H3
Steve Forslund
602 471-9180
Visiting pilot
26985
P4
H3
Dan Francis
(619) 403-0811
Visiting Pilot
94985
P3
Christopher Garcia
6362210515
Local Pilot
99143
P2
Alan Gardner
8312331667
Local Pilot
39576
P4
Louis Garton
541-690-9567
Local Pilot
60646
P3
David Gibbs
707 845-3666
Local Pilot
82522
H3
Adam Gilmore
650 465-5745
Visiting pilot
84049
P2
Jacob Glass
6099293023
Visiting Pilot
97679
P4
Sam Glasser
7072723085
Visiting Pilot
93626
P2
Hayden Glatte
541-778-2952
Local Commercial Pilot
71874
P4
Jim Goebl
530 531-5396
Visiting Pilot
41259
H4
Jeffrey Gray
541-420-6296
Visiting Pilot
87767
P3
nicholas greece
5168161333
Visiting pilot
77944
P4
H1
Ryan Grizzell
541-941-1496
Local Pilot
90457
P4
Donneta Grizzell
5416214966
Local Pilot
90479
* P1 * P2 * P3
Craig Grossmann
NA
Local Pilot
95988
P2
Michelle Haag
16312946520
7 Day Pilot
87789
H3
Scott Haines
541 9081313
Visiting pilot
97554
P2
Mike Haley
503 704-7004
Local Commercial Pilot
21835
P5
H4
Gail Haley
503 789-5157
Local Pilot
78288
P1
Nicholas Hamblin
(360) 216-5911
Visiting Pilot
94901
P4
Gregory Hansen
(503) 310-4879
Visiting Pilot
97722
P2
Scott Harding
5418401662
Visiting Pilot
85443
P4
Brad Hauge
4068605975
Visiting Pilot
71530
P4
Schuyler Heath
(415) 886-5368
Visiting Pilot
95128
P4
Jeff Hedlund
808 281-4304
Visiting pilot
93166
P4
David Hellerstein
916-803-4378
Visiting Pilot
27262
P3
Matthew Henzi
2066791963
Visiting Pilot
95541
P3
Steve Hines
530 941 4771
Visiting Pilot
35318
P4
H3
Josh Hockett
206 351-5097
Visiting Pilot
88478
P4
Taylor Houshour
541 951-3490
Local Pilot
student
P0
Kent Hudson
(907) 229-7207
Visiting Pilot
12985
P4
H4
Bill Hughes
5038886336
Visiting Pilot
69869
P4
Chris Irish
206-817-5269
Visiting Pilot
91005
P3
Brian Jackson
503 442-2315
local pilot
91262
Michael Jahn
541-941-5400
Local Pilot
88924
P4
Scott Jennings
248-909-3919
Local Pilot
84638
P3
Rod Johnson
(541) 690-6274
Local Pilot
87826
P2
Jeff Johnson
503-720-7122
visiting pilot
94689
P3
James Johnston
415 235-2855
Visiting pilot
64131
P4
Nick Kedev
971-219-9346
visiting pilot
95582
P3
Ed Keller
541-890-6080
Local Pilot
503362
P0
Chris Kennedy
530-739-0206
Visiting Pilot
98154
P2
Paul Kunzl
253 732-8374
Visiting pilot
76983
P4
Alex Landt
541 816 6568
Local Pilot
94954
P2
Dirk Larson
503 505-1112
Visiting Pilot
95285
P3
Nicholas Lavallee
3852756425
Visiting Pilot
97583
P3
David Le
503-358-9989
visiting pilot
95156
P3
Kevin Lee
5418907142
Local Commercial Pilot
61759
P4
David Lehr
650 888 6506
Visiting pilot
89087
P4
Loren Lemcke
5202473312
Visiting Pilot
99016
* P0 * P1 * P2
Paul Leonard Jr.
208 699 4243
Visiting Pilot
91565
P3
Dmitry Lepikhin
6506465713
Visiting Pilot
91223
P2
H3
Bruce Logan
5416014840
Local Pilot
72179
P4
Cordino Longiotti
541-941-1788
Local Pilot
95251
P3
Joseph Loser
541-892-3599
Local Pilot
78913
P2
Jon Lovering
4088321827
Visiting Pilot
91466
P4
Tayt Low
(403) 915-5551
Visiting Pilot
97417
P3
Keith A. Lowe
503 484-7793
Visiting Pilot
97565
P3
Markus Luedin
317 437-4881
Visiting Pilot
96774
P2
Scott Macleod
253 888-3977
Visiting pilot
90598
P4
H3
Zac Majors
4157154757
Visiting Pilot
61693
H4
Majo Majors
3528050610
Visiting Pilot
97304
H3
Richard Marsh
202-550-6072
Visiting Pilot
95882
P4
Patti Mayfield
541-221-0908
Visiting Pilot
494389
P0
Robert McCullough
3212777796
Visiting Pilot
90901
P2
Camille McCullough
3212877043
Visiting Pilot
91106
P2
David Mcnulty
207 576-7595
Visiting pilot
90110
P4
George McPherson
503-887-4542
visiting pilot
68437
P4
jane mcwhorter
541 410 5285
Visiting Pilot
84809
P2
Ken Millard
503 780-1553
Visiting Pilot
82705
H3
Eric Miller
503-490-5494
Visiting Pilot
88918
P4
Ryan Miller
808 265 6561
Local Pilot
94229
P2
Eric Miller
503 490 5494
Visiting Pilot
88918
P4
Tony miller
5305152155
Visiting Pilot
N/A
P1
kelly miller
512-820-7172
Visiting Pilot
86552
P4
Don Mills
5309452005
Visiting Pilot
54088
P4
Maria Teresa Montero Terry
(805) 450-0525
Visiting Pilot
89147
P4
michael moore
541 301-2293
Local Pilot
98218
P1
Thomas Mullin
9517759370
Visiting Pilot
60626
P2
H4
Paul Murdoch
5412614900
Local Pilot
74517
P4
Kurt Niznik
7072990639
Visiting Pilot
80869
P4
Wilson Nolan
661 619 7320
Visiting Pilot
92931
P4
Shawn Northrop
541 761 8562
Local Pilot
Temp 494387
Mauro Oliveira
5416259736
Local Pilot
0000000
P3
Jasen Olsen
541-200-5330
visiting pilot
90731
P2
Kelsey Opstad
907 632 6466
Visiting Pilot
95142
P2
Erik Oterholt
503 577-1570
Visiting pilot
88301
P4
Lee Overton
2066503201
Visiting Pilot
91115
P4
Jason Parrott
704 918-5563
Visiting pilot
71432
P2
Mike Pekin
831 9053756
Visiting Pilot
51596
P4
H4
Robert Peloquin
8053903308
Visiting Pilot
79409
P4
Carlos Pena
603-438-4822
visiting pilot
92937
P3
DAVID PENDZICK
8584421633
Local Pilot
91924
H4
Kelly Phillips
(510) 390-2289
Visiting Pilot
96707
P2
Eric Pierce
541 646-1942
Visiting Pilot
88828
P2
Peter Powers
541-913-5937
Visiting Pilot
94259
P3
Vince Price
503 784-3638
Visiting Pilot
97848
P3
William Purden
(801) 414-6732
Visiting Pilot
74824
P4
William Purden
801-4146732
Visiting pilot
74824
P4
Alexander Ralston
541 613-4465
Local Pilot
000000000
P0
Michael Ramsey
8012002513
Visiting Pilot
97299
P2
Rick Ray
541-326-1214
Local Pilot
74407
P4
glenn richardson
4806284570
Local Pilot
70327
P4
Cody Richardson
3852275327
Local Pilot
85981
P4
Mitch Riley
786325724
Visiting Pilot
85839
P4
Clay P Riley
5416468699
Local Pilot
98219
P2
Alan Roberts
541-324-1088
Local Pilot
91033
P2
Richard Roche
4065700681
Visiting Pilot
97913
P2
Diego Rojas
(916) 267-7923
Visiting Pilot
90536
P3
Glenn Rose
530-863-7566
visiting pilot
49143
H4
Simon Roumier
503-473-4102
visiting pilot
98691
P3
Jae Rowan
541-973-8793
Local Pilot
88525
P2
Gregory Sadowy
6263905213
Visiting Pilot
94123
P3
Ron Sand
(530) 949-2259
Visiting Pilot
93750
P2
Mark Sanzone
5036790962
Visiting Pilot
69684
P4
John Sargent
503 939-8366
Visiting pilot
67247
P4
Gabriel Schwarzmann
977-227-8656
visiting pilot
97617
IPPI 5
Garrett Scott
989-640-8949
Visiting Pilot
83439
P4
Scott Settlemier
5083609470
Visiting Pilot
67752
P3
Jonathon Severdia
971 409-9924
Visiting Pilot
93092
H3
Jakob Shockey
5417613312
Local Pilot
95663
P2
homer Simpson
15038041077
Local Pilot
99999
P5
Paul B. Smith
808 269-0443
Visiting pilot
TJ Sopher
206-465-3738
Visiting Pilot
85280
P4
Loren Sperber
916 662-2144
Visiting Pilot
90622
P4
Julie Spiegler
415-218-3237
Visiting Pilot
54168
P4
Rob Sporrer
(805) 331-5751
Visiting Pilot
66600
P4
Jon Stallman
530 864-5110
Visiting Pilot
69902
P4
Richard Stewart
5416601508
Local Pilot
94235
P3
Destino Stonehouse
(541) 591-2471
Local Pilot
93083
P4
Sam Sturgeon
Local Pilot
93391
P3
Mike Sturges
8023181281
Visiting Pilot
94369
P4
George Sturtevant
425-260-4842
Visiting Pilot
37685
P5
H4
C.J. Sturtevant
425-922-6493
Visiting Pilot
37684
P5
H5
Barbara Summerhawk
Local Pilot
82767
P4
Will Taylor
7405917100
Local Pilot
Student
P0
LEE TESTORFF
831-239-8842
Local Pilot
93334
P3
Brian Thibeault
541 531 6595
Visiting Pilot
P4
James Tibbs
541 660-170
Local Pilot
82002
H5
Brian Tupper
408 230-4915
Visiting pilot
95381
P3
Daniel Vallieres
587-297-8947
Visiting Pilot
99200
* P2 * P3
Thai Verzone
9072507673
Visiting Pilot
94691
P3
Scotty Vincik
907-952-9365
Local Pilot
92500
P3
Debbie Vosevich
707.223.3342
Visiting Pilot
82418
P4
H3
Emily "milly" Wallace
8015560475
Visiting Pilot
91376
P4
Dustin Webinger
6125328360
Visiting Pilot
97122
P2
ELIZABETH WEIGAND
5412285330
Visiting Pilot
97842
P2
PAul Weiseth
3603938622
Visiting Pilot
98639
P2
Daniel Wells
(503) 804-1077
Local Pilot
78246
P4
Ed Wenker
541 324 1319
Visiting Pilot
85605
P3
Tyler Wescott
5186515870
7 Day Pilot
98391
P2
Clifton Westin
5038872993
Visiting Pilot
92164
P3
Kate Eagle Westin
5412506435
Visiting Pilot
94240
P3
H2
Allison Wibby
503-422-3738
Visiting Pilot
94056
P2
JULIE WILLIAMS
2064274234
Visiting Pilot
88686
P4
Kurt Wimberg
Visiting Pilot
50842
H4
Jeffrey Wishnie
5038939193
Visiting Pilot
69364
P4
John Wolfe
5209064868
Visiting Pilot
83499
P4
Norm Young
541.450.9462
Local Pilot
88007
P3
Steven Young
650-619-4623
Visiting Pilot
62564
P3
Michele Zeidman
206 550-4756
Visiting Pilot
88808
P3
Yuval Zonnenschein
(541) 292-2736
Local Pilot
USHPA temp memborship
P0
Derek Zwagerman
541-301-1756
Local Pilot
92077
P2
]]>
Hunter Charity Dinner 2017 http://rvhpa.org/uncategorized/hunter-charity-dinner-2017/ Thu, 09 Jun 2016 22:21:30 +0000 http://rvhpa.org/?p=3611 dinner_panorama

You’re invited!

Charities_2016

                                          2017 Hunter Charity Recipients

Every year, the Rogue Valley Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association holds a fund raising dinner benefiting charities identified by the Hunter family.  The Hunter family has graciously allowed us to use their fields for landing without charge for many, many years. This is the club’s way of saying thank you.  This year’s recipients chosen by the Hunters are the Magdalene Home and Godfrey Masauli. The Magdalene Home provides assistance to homeless and pregnant teenage women.  We will also be helping Godfrey with living expenses while he pursues his dream to become a commercial pilot.

 

When:  Sunday June 18, 2017 

Serving  from 5:45 pm till 8:15 pm

 Where: Rat Race Headquarters

Directions: 
– Turn Left 9/10 of a mile past mile marker 28 (Markers are on the east/left side of Hwy)
– Turn left on Cindi lane just past Log Town Cemetery which is on the left, go 200 yards and turn right. Follow signs.

Menu:

Mains:  Grilled chicken,  Beans/Tofu
Sides: corn on the cob, aduki beans, white rice, potato salad,  green salad, dinner rolls
Drinks:  Soft drinks and lemonade included, Beer available for  a small charge
Dessert: Brownies and fresh fruit with whipping cream

Suggested donation:  

$15  for adults $10 for children

That’s just a suggestion we are happy with less and even happier with more.

Advance sales:

Do us a favor with headcount  planning and make your donation now using PayPal and pick up your tickets at the event.  Enter the number of meals you want when your donation is processed in PayPal.

Can’t make it?  Please consider just making a donation.  

RVHPA is a registered as a 501 3 (c) non-profit and you donations are tax deductible




Want to volunteer to help with the event?

Contact Terri Eubanks
eubankst@sou.edu
(541) 778-2937

]]>
RVHPA’s USHPA Free Flight Forever http://rvhpa.org/uncategorized/rvhpa-announces-ushpa-free-flight-forever-rrg-matching/ Tue, 26 Jan 2016 00:35:27 +0000 http://rvhpa.org/?p=3470

Attention RVHPA local members!

Club matching has ended but you can still make a difference with a donation to the RRG.

Use this button to donate to USHPA’ RRG campaign through RVHPA.


Or if you like donate directly to USHPA!

Click here to donate directly to USHPA.

 

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test page to evaluate weather widgets http://rvhpa.org/uncategorized/test-page-to-evaluate-weather-widgets/ Mon, 05 Oct 2015 19:46:03 +0000 http://rvhpa.org/?p=3317

Weather Underground PWS KOROREGO39

Updated: 10:55 PM GMT on April 20, 2016 (1 hour ago)

 

 

RVHPA Longsword Vineyard LZ Weather Station

RVHPA Woodrat upper launch Weather Station. Click graph for larger image.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RVHPA Longsword Vineyard LZ Weather Station

RVHPA Longsword Vineyard LZ Weather Station. Click graph for larger image.

 

 

]]>
Understanding Rabe’s Ridge http://rvhpa.org/uncategorized/understanding-rabes-ridge/ Sat, 14 Feb 2015 23:40:57 +0000 http://rvhpa.org/?p=2091 Rabies-view

We start our discussion about the dynamics of Rabe’s Ridge with a toast. Hoist a brew in appreciation of Mike Rabe, the early Woodrat hang glider who pioneered much of the early exploration of the ridge above China Gulch. Flying from Woodrat in the early 1980’s, he spent so much time over there that the ridge was named for him. Thanks Mike for your inquisitive and bold exploration! We are all indebted to you.

As Yogi Berra said, “You can observe a lot just by looking.”

Rabies_1

Rabe’s Ridge starts across the valley from Woodrat Mountain. I have outlined the ridge proper with a red line. Inside of that bounded area is China Gulch. I have also outlined the ridge just to the West of China Gulch with an orange line. The reason for that lies in the importance of that ridge for understanding some of the dynamics occurring along Rabe’s Ridge and within China Gulch.

TOPOGRAPHY:
The first element in trying to understand the dynamics of Rabe’s Ridge lies in its orientation. It is a catchment basin aligned towards the Southwest. It starts catching the full force of the sun’s heating very early in the morning and continues throughout the day. It is surrounded by higher terrain on three sides and therefore the trapped heat tends to stay within the gulch until it is either released in the form of a thermal or successfully works its way out of the gulch in the form of up slope flow.

VALLEY WINDS:
Consider the normal West up valley wind flow. Two sections from the MetEd site, Flow Interaction with Topography and Thermally-forced Circulation II: Mountain/Valley Breezes provide help in understanding how valley flow develops during the daytime. It is very important to realize that valley flow starts below ridge top levels but when fully developed, can extend up well above the valley sidewalls sometimes by a thousand feet or more feet. A simple illustration can be found in a loaf of bread. It starts out as a lump of dough that is below the pan height but as it bakes, it expands up and over the sides of the pan. Valley winds are similar. The important thing to realize is that valley winds can have a lower and upper level aspect to them. The lower aspect wind is below the valley rim and follows the contours of the valley as it winds its way towards higher terrain. The upper level valley winds, those above the sidewalls but below the larger regional winds, can skip over some of the bends and twists of the valley’s topography and then reunite with the lower level flows as it progresses towards the higher terrain. Above them are the larger scale winds. Here are a couple of maps to illustrate this.

The following picture is an attempt to show the lower level West up valley flow with the smaller upslope flows.
Rabies2

If we add in the upper level valley flow we get something like this:

Rabbies_3

This is an attempt to show the complexity of a typical West up valley flow. The lower flow and the slope flow is marked in yellow. The upper valley flow is represented by the large blue arrows. The resulting rotor that occurs as the upper valley flow interacts with the terrain is the light purple sections.
The predominate up valley flow from the West is both compressing the air into the gulch in its lower level form and, more importantly, on a typical West flow day, is spilling over the higher ridge outlined in orange and flowing down and across the lower valley flow in the China Gulch areas as upper level valley flow. This has a number of important considerations when we try to understand what is happening when we fly Rabe’s Ridge.

INTERACTION OF TOPOGRAPHY AND VALLEY FLOW:

The interaction of up valley wind flow and topography turns the China Gulch area into an almost perfect thermal nursery. The importance of the split level valley wind flow, with the upper level flow being temporarily at an angle to the lower flow, is that for all intents and purposes, China Gulch is a lee side catchment basin. This has several important impacts on the relatively stagnant air mass within China Gulch. As air flows downhill there is an incremental increase in heating throughout the gulch. Additionally, the lee side of a ridge or mountain develops a micro-level low pressure system. The net effect of that low pressure is an increase in instability. This translates into a hotter air mass that is being encouraged to rise by the lower pressure differential.
Basically China Gulch becomes a super adiabatic thermal generator. Compared to other surrounding areas it releases thermals more frequently and of a greater relative strength than does more windswept areas or areas with more of a homogenous valley flow. We see the effects of these super adiabatic thermal releases almost all the time while flying Rabe’s Ridge. We usually climb 500 to 1000 feet higher along the ridge than we do elsewhere. This is a direct result of these more potent thermals emerging out of China Gulch.

FLYING RABE’S RIDGE ON A TYPICAL LIGHT WEST VALLEY FLOW DAY:

1. There are NO SAFE landing zones inside of China Gulch! You have to either climb out or leave yourself enough height to return to Hunters or Longswords. There have been a number of broken bones and torn up gliders that have resulted from ignoring this.

2. Don’t get below the ridges! See #1. If you get below the ridges, you run a good chance of encountering the upper level valley flow as it interacts with the terrain. Alternatively, you will be possibly exposing yourself to a super adiabatic thermal close to the ground. It is okay to scream if you ignore this advice and encounter one.

Rabies_4

This picture shows most of the known rotor areas that develop on a typical West up valley flow day. The size and the intensity of the rotor areas are directly tied to wind speed. The stronger the velocity, the more intense the rotor is going to be. Basically, avoid flying below ridge level while in China Gulch especially in the Wellington Butte to Rabe’s Peak area and in the Rabe’s Peak to Sugar Loaf area.

3. There is often an amazing amount of bubbly lift and its associated turbulence drifting along Rabe’s Ridge as the two levels of valley flow merge. It often feels like weaker bits and pieces of wandering thermals between the pronounced thermals. I often think of it as the Rabe’s Ridge flak zone. Like some old World War 2 bomber flying through a flak field, my glider shudders and surges as I go questing up towards Rabe’s Peak in search of a coherent climb. Then, boom, there‘s the mothership! My point is, make sure that you are really in a developed thermal before you start turning. Additionally, it is not uncommon to start climbing in a upslope flow thermal along Rabe’s Ridge towards the West and then enter into the upper level valley wind and find yourself being pushed towards the East. Frequently, you have to stair step your way towards Rabe’s Peak. You push forward into the thermal and then as it climbs up into the upper level valley winds, you drift back towards Woodrat or Burnt and then push forwards towards Rabe’s Peak again and catch another thermal further up the ridge and repeat.

4. It is possible to get too much of a good thing. Sometimes the super adiabatic thermals can just be bigger than I am willing to eat or try to drag home. Some days I just need to cut and run. It is like the old Kenny Rogers song “Know when to hold them, know when to fold them, know when to run away”. Fly within your comfort zone and realistically know your own limitations.

5. A fun part of flying Rabe’s Ridge is the fact that the upper monsoonal flow over the whole region during the summer is from the South. It makes it possible for us to frequently climb through both valley layers while thermalling on Rabe’s and climb up into the South flow. Sometimes this makes it possible to fly to Grant’s Pass with a tailwind as long as we are above the valley winds, then fly back to Woodrat at a lower level with a tailwind using the upper level valley flow. Tailwinds in both directions but at different altitudes. Sweet! For non XC pilots, the ability to sometimes climb to 10,000 feet on a good day is its own reward.

6. Rabe’s Ridge on a North wind influenced day is for experienced pilots only. As a North wind develops and makes its influence felt, the lift coming out of China Gulch is driven off of the ridge as the North begins to exert itself. A Northerly wind creates a nasty sheer as the lower level up valley flow clashes with the North. As it swings more, past 330 degrees, the sheer gets very pronounced. In the 2014 Rat Race, we had the most ever reserve tosses within a period of days. A weather comparison looking at Medford airport winds for the period 2008-2014 revealed that one of the primary differences between 2014 and earlier years laid in the high number of days with the wind flow exceeding 320 degrees. Rabe’s Ridge on Northerly days yields significant turbulence and isn’t that enjoyable.

Additional reading:

C.D.Whiteman. Mountain Meteorology: Fundamentals and Applications.
Leeside throughing download at: http://www.atmos.albany.edu/student/dthompso/ATM504%20Presentation.ppt
Also http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1311/1311.1860.pdf

Rick Ray January 31, 2015

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Star Thistle 2017 http://rvhpa.org/events/star-thistle-fly-in/ Tue, 05 May 2015 17:44:14 +0000 http://rvhpa.org/?p=2167 Star Thistle turns 41!

Star Thistle Fly-in   September 9-10, 2017

Come help us celebrate the 41st Star Thistle fly-in.

We’re planning a low key, fun fly-in Sept. 9-10 at Woodrat Mt in Ruch, OR.  Enjoy hanging out with your friends and experiencing those big thermal mid-day conditions and smooth evening glass off flights Woodrat has to offer.

Registration is free with your RVHPA annual or 7 day membership.  GET a FREE Raffle Ticket when you register.

There will be pilot appreciation breakfast Saturday morning.   Saturday evening there will be a Spaghetti dinner fund raiser for the Ruch School put on by the Cascade Paragliding Club.

There will be a raffle following the dinner.  We will also have commemorative T-shirts and coffee mugs for sale.

It’s all happening at the LongSword Winery Landing Zone

Schedule of Events

 Friday Sept. 8

– Early registration Raffle ticket, mug and T-shirt sales at LongSword LZ (3 – 7pm)

– Early arrivals and Glass Off flying

 Saturday Sept. 9

– Pilot appreciation breakfast and registration at LongSword LZ  (8 – 9:30 am)
-Pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, juice, coffee
-Donations accepted

-Pilots meeting at LongSword LZ 
-Welcome to Woodrat- Norm Young  (9:00 am)
-P2 site briefing for pilots new to Woodrat- Kevin Lee (9:05 am)
-Safety and weather for mid-day flyers- Rick Ray  (10:00 am)

-Food truck on site for lunches and snacks (12-4 pm) 
Keila’s Arepas  Venezuelan sandwiches

-Entertainment at the LongSword Tasting room patio  (1-4 pm)
-Rock trio Rickashane

– Ruch School spaghetti dinner fundraiser at LongSword LZ  (6:30 – 8:00 pm)
-Cascade paragliding club crew
-$7.50 donation requested

-Raffle (8:00 pm)

 -Other Saturday activities
-Post flight wine tasting at LongSword Tasting room
-T-shirt, mug, and raffle ticket sales at LongSword LZ  (9:00 am — 8:30 pm)

Sunday August 10

– Free Flying
-Wine tasting at LongSword tasting room

Other notes:

Important LongSword and Hunter landing zone rules

-No dogs
-No smoking
-No outside alcohol (beer and wine available at the LongSword tasting room)

Registration Fee

– NONE.  Only RVHPA membership required (annual or 7 day)

Raffle

– Get one free ticket at registration
– Tickets on sale by RVHPA helpers throughout event and at the Dinner for $2 each or 6 for $10

Shuttles

– There should be plenty of drivers to shuttle pilots from the various LZ’s to launch.  We plan on having a few dedicated shuttle vehicles or you can arrange rides with other pilots.  Customary fee for a ride is $5 to Mid-launch and $10 to the Upper launch.  More details at the pilots meeting Saturday morning.

A few camping/ low cost lodging options close to the Launch and the LZs

-The Crash Pad
-Raven’s landing
-Cantrall Buckley Park

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Classifieds http://rvhpa.org/news/classifieds/ Tue, 17 Feb 2015 06:05:16 +0000 http://rvhpa.org/?p=2129 Have gear you want to sell?    Or maybe  you are looking to buy some used paragliding gear?

 

Try one of these links:

 

Cascade Paragliding Club’s classified section

Facebook’s Paragliding gear swap USA

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Understanding Burnt Ridge http://rvhpa.org/tips/understanding-burnt-ridge/ Sat, 14 Feb 2015 05:33:34 +0000 http://rvhpa.org/?p=2078 Burntt_banner

Once upon a time, there were three paragliding pilots named Lucky, Skilled, and Judgment. Much like the story of the three little pigs, it was the last named of the three pigs that kept them all from finally getting devoured by the Bad Wolf. In the real world, it is educated judgment that will go a long way towards insuring that you have a safe flying career.It will help you chose when, where and how to fly.

The following is a test run for a discussion about Flying at Woodrat and How and Why it seems to work as it does. Some of what follows are educated guesses on mine and others part.  I hope to help our newer pilots and relocated pilots gain an understanding of why our airmass is as it is. For newer pilots to hear talk about House Thermals, Convergence Lines, Rotor Zones, and the Wall of Wind is intimidating and makes what they are getting ready to launch into mysterious and slightly spooky. Hopefully, this discussion will help you fly with more confidence and insight.

I want to introduce an awesome, free, weather resource that will professional level discussions and illustrations of what is happening around Woodrat.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/index.php

I would strongly encourage you to create your own account. After you have created your account click on the Education and Training button and then, after browsing around, click on the Mountain Meteorology button.
From a meteorological viewpoint, Burnt Ridge is one of the more important features influencing the flying in the immediate vicinity of Woodrat.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=57#.VKLbJl4CcA.

This module on “flow interaction with topography” found in the Mountain Meteorology section illustrates how and why Burnt plays such an important role in our local flying. As the valley flow comes by Woodrat, we can see how Burnt Ridge creates a compression zone that effectively slows the wind down in the immediate area of Woodrat Mountain. We can see how and why that the outer edge of that compression area (towards Longsword) causes a deflection of some of the incoming valley wind causing an acceleration or barrier jet to form. This is our so-called Wall of Wind. Understand when they say jet, that they are only talking about a relative escalation of the ambient wind speed. Simplistically pu, wind ,like water, seeks the path of least resistance. Instead of pushing against the gradient caused by Burnt Ridge, and rather than having to push through the existing compressed airmass or climb up and over it, some of the air takes the path of least resistance and hurries off towards the lake.

Burnt Ridge is also one of the causal factors in why we have such frequent convergence zones in the immediate vicinity of Woodrat. Air is never a static state. It pulses and surges and ebbs.This undulation is caused in part by the Applegate valley flow pressure out near Longsword. As the valley flow surges or ebbs, it causes the slowed down airmass from the vicinity of school to Burnt Ridge to flex by either tightening up or relaxing. Think just for a moment of a big crowd of people in a confined area. Add one more, they squish together. Take one away and everyone relaxes a little bit. Same thing at Woodrat. Pressure against a compression zone causes ripples to run through the compressed airmass. Another cause of convergence caused by Burnt Ridge is the downward flowing air in Forrest Creek attempting to squeeze into the compressed air in front of Burnt.

Burnt Ridge plays a very important role in the quality of our flying experience at Woodrat. Hopefully this brief look at Flow interaction With Topography will stimulate a good discussion. If we can learn and visualize what is going on, we will make safer flying decisions over time.

Rick Ray

December 30, 2014

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Flying to Donato’s http://rvhpa.org/tips/flying-to-donatos/ Thu, 07 May 2015 21:08:23 +0000 http://rvhpa.org/?p=2182 Donato_banner

Flying around Woodrat Mountain takes many forms. From the first exhilarating flights of the new student, to magical glass offs, to the first venturing afield out to LongSword winery, there are many rites of passage that we move through as we develop as a pilot. We remember the wonder of that first thermal flight as suddenly we started going up. We were catching a glimpse of the invisible power around us as the atmosphere moves and flexes. Through trial and error, mentoring and study, we soon became proficient at finding a second and then a third thermal. Our flights started lasting longer and longer. We started getting higher and higher on the better days. Then, under the tutelage of a mentor, we made the trip out to LongSword winery. As our skills advanced and we could bumble about the valley on our own, seemingly at will, our world shrank, until the Ruch area wasn’t big enough to hold us. We wanted to explore.

The topic here is about flying from Woodrat to Donato’s house in Talent, a distance of about 10 miles. It is not a long flight in terms of distance but it is a significant flight in terms of the skills and judgment required to safely accomplish. Safety considerations, airspace realities, landing zone accessibility, thermal and lift locations are going to dictate how we responsibly navigate those 10 miles.
Donato_1

On the left you can see Woodrat. On the right, we see Donato’s house. That is our goal.  So how do we get to Donato’s?
For this discussion, we are going to fly from Burnt Ridge on a TYPICAL WEST VALLEY FLOW DAY at Woodrat. North flow days around the Woodrat Mountain area yield a different dynamic and that is not covered in this material.
The short 10 mile flight to Donato’s is not a magic carpet ride and there are no guarantees that you will pull it off if you follow this guide. However, we have had hundreds and hundreds of pilots in the Rat Race and free flyers that have made it to Donato’s over the years. A compilation of the track logs of many of these flights can be found on Michael von Kanel’s website.

 

Here is the raw data from his site with all the thermal lift locations marked in blue. These are locations where people have found lift. Don’t get excited yet!

Donato_2

 

 

If we then use the toolbar and uncheck ‘show thermals’ and check ‘show hotspots’ then we get a map that looks like this.

Donato_3and_10

If we then superimpose the Woodrat waypoint list then we get a map  that looks like this.  Note that for the most part, the hotspots and the waypoints coincide.

Donato_4

.

Now we are getting somewhere. We have some of the elements that we need to create a plan whereby we are going to fly to Donato’s. But, first we need to add another very important detail: Medford AIRSPACE. Medford is a Class E airspace and there are APPROACH CORRIDORS IN THE NEAR VICINITY TO DONATO’S.

Donato_5

 

Note that the approach corridor is in near proximity to Donato’s. If we take the sectional waypoints and put them on Google, then it looks like this.

Donato_6

NOTICE SEVERAL CRITICALLY IMPORTANT POINTS.

1.The descent corridor is in close proximity to Donato’s house. The approach corridor comes down from the vicinity of Mt. Ashland and Wagner Butte and follows the Wagner creek drainage towards Talent and Medford. The white line shown is a generalized glide line. The important point is that descending aircraft come through the drainage, dropping down from the high ground in the West and traversing the area in the near vicinity of Donato’s house.

2. The elevation at Donato’s house is approximately 2000MSL. The airplanes near his house are descending, crossing from West to East, at approximately 7200 MSL.

3. The further you get out into the main Medford valley towards I-5 then the lower the planes are.

 

WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE AIRSPACE AND HOW DOES IT IMPACT OUR TRIP TO DONATO’S?

At Woodrat, we are near the edge of the Medford airspace. Woodrat is not in the keyway extension.

Donato_7and_13

We are flying to the very edge of an active descent corridor. WE MUST FLY RESPONSIBLE. We don’t break airspace by flying towards Medford. We don’t break airspace by flying out towards the I-5 corridor. We don’t break airspace by encroaching into the airplane descent altitudes near Donato’s. We land at Donato’s located immediately this side of the corridor. We make sure that that landing approach is less than 5000 MSL and is made from the Southwest edge of the Anderson Creek/Wagner Creek drainage.

 

 

HAVING ASSEMBLED THE PIECES, LET’S FLY TO DONATO’S FROM WOODRAT VIA BURNT RIDGE.

Burnt Ridge is the interface zone between the Applegate Valley in which Woodrat is located and the Rogue River Valley in which Medford and Donato’s is located. On a typical WEST VALLEY FLOW day at Woodrat, it is a convergence zone . Winds are coming up from the Ruch side from the West and from the Jacksonville /Medford side from the North. The convergence zone that results from these clashing windflows often produces incredible climbs. Sometimes the climbs can be turbulent as the thermals push up through and around the competing windflows. Remember that convergences always have a windward and a leeside and as the altitude changes these can reverse places with an accompanying horizontal wind sheer. The thermals at Burnt tend to slide up the interface zone while being deflected towards the weaker side of the convergence. For example, if the Jacksonville push is stronger, the thermal inclination during the climb tends toward Ruch and visa versa.

1. BEFORE YOU LAUNCH BE FAMILIAR WITH THE NO LAND AREAS! There are three located along the route towards Donato’s. It is Your responsibility to know where these are and to avoid them otherwise you put our flying site at risk by creating ill will and the possibility of bad reports.  See RVHPA  LZ information at http://bit.ly/rvhpa-lz
Donato_8

2. Look at the hotspot map from earlier. This will give you and idea of where the more consistent lift has been found. You will want to string these together like the beads on a necklace. However, there often is a surprising amount of convergence lift to be found on the way to Donato’s. I think that we see this in the numerous lift sources on one of the earlier maps.

3. When to start? When do I leave the Woodrat area to go towards Burnt? The higher the better. You do not want to get to Burnt below ridge top! If the Jacksonville flow is strong and you arrive below ridge height, you would be inside the rotor zone and close to the ground. A bad place to find oneself! Get to Burnt above ridge height! The higher the better. Lower class gliders should have at least 5000 feet at Woodrat before attempting the crossing to Burnt. Higher is good.
I usually aim for the Burnt waypoint and then troll back and forth along Burnt ridge between Hwy 238 and the waypoint until I hit lift. That is, unless Hayden is there. Then, I just follow Hayden. Don’t leave Burnt to go on towards Donato’s below 5500. It very seldom pays off. Patience is the name of the game. Wait until you get the great climb. The higher the better. It gives you more options later in the course. Leaving Burnt, I usually head towards Portman’s or Cemetery waypoints because they also happen to be hotspots.

4.CAUTION. Notice that even on the general thermal map that very little lift is found in the fingers and spines as you move towards Donato’s. I have marked them with a red line. They are a very attractive trap. There are no landing zones. It is a long glide out to safety against a headwind. There have been a number of serious injuries that have occurred with pilots getting trapped in there. STAY TOWARDS THE MAIN VALLEY.

Donato_9

5. The tale of the two quarries White and Red. Remember this map from earlier?

Donato_4

We have successfully worked our way along the course and we are somewhere in the vicinity of the last three hotspots before Donato’s. See the map. Somewhere in here we need to climb to at least 5000 feet in order to make the last valley crossing to our goal. In front of you is the Dark Hollow Ridge. To the right of your course line is the white quarry. On the Dark Hollow ridge is a red quarry. Somewhere in here you need to get a climb. Usually you have to work at it. Patience is the name of the game. You really need to be close to 5000 feet to attempt the next jump because the intervening valley is pretty lacking in bailout lz’s and the wind is getting venturied into the higher terrain to the West. So, be patient. Troll. Pray. Don’t go until you get the height. Keep an LZ within reach during your trolling. Remember that there is one NO LAND ZONE that needs to be avoided even if it looks attractive.

Donato_11

6. Dark Hollow Landing Zone-the abode of the hopeless and forsaken and the non- patient. You bombed out.

Donato_12A

Good job. You almost got there. Reflect on your performance. Weigh your decisions. What went well and what would you do differently next time? Did you run out of patience? Did you do anything questionable or sketchy as to your safety margins?

7. Leaving the Dark Hollow Ridge. You got your 5000 feet and you are ready to start your final push to Donato’s. AIRSPACE BECOMES THE KEY ISSUE FROM THIS POINT ON.

Donato_7and_13

Donato_14

Notice the glide slopes on the bottom of this chart.  Many of the airplanes are coming in on an instrument approach. The computer is descending according to pre-set altitudes. The pilots are not expecting anyone to be in their FAA designated flight path. They are descending according to the computer and are not necessarily looking out the windows to see if you are busting their airspace. In the near vicinity of Donato LZ the planes are descending and are below 7200 feet if on instrument approach. But, and it is a BIG BUT, the pilots can exert their freedom to declare VFR if the weather conditions allow it. Basically a VFR, Visual Flight Rules, flight can be lower than 7200. Numerous times near Donato’s, VFR flights will come through the corridor around 6000 ft.

Donato_15

The above picture is Google Earth at 28.51 miles above the surface. Note the numbers given by the respective waypoint. These are the altitudes that the airplane is to have at those locations. See also the above charts. Let’s zoom in closer. Let’s look at this same picture from 7200 MSL- this is close to altitude that planes transit this area along those glide slopes.

Donato_16

Donato’s house is on the left edge of this map and it shows his house in relationship to the MFR air descent corridor. The planes are coming through the corridor usually between 6-7000 feet. We have to stay below them or we run the real time risk of a mid-air or a near miss.

Have fun.   Fly safe and responsibly.

Rick Ray

April, 2015

 

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